Our Credentials

17. 05. 04
Last Updated: 30 June 2017

Sunshine Sugar takes pride in producing a high quality and safe product.

We are certified sustainable by the Bonsucro Standard which promotes measureable standards in the environmental and social impacts of sugarcane production and primary processing while recognizing the need for economic viability.

Our sugar products have also been manufactured according to the certified SQF 2000 Level 3 management system, incorporating HACCP and are Halal and Kosher certified.

                   SQF logo                Kosher lgo                Halal certification

Our sugar products are GM-FREE

 

Our sugar is Woolworths Quality Assured

Woolworths Certification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bonsucro

Bonsucro is a global network providing tools, connections and support across the sugar cane industry to help develop professionalism and resilience in the businesses who work with sugarcane and its many products.

Bonsucro’s vision is a sugarcane sector with thriving, sustainable producer communities and resilient, assured supply chains. Bonsucro’s mission is to ensure that responsible sugarcane production creates lasting value for the people, communities, businesses, economies and eco-systems in all cane-growing origins. Bonsucro’s strategy builds a platform to accelerate change for the largest agricultural commodity in the world – sugarcane.

Bonsucro CertificationBonsucro image

The Bonsucro Production Standard uses 6 principles to achieve sustainability in the production of sugarcane and its derived products.

They cater to the three pillars of sustainability: environmental, social and economic.

     1. Obey the law

     2. Respect human rights and labour standards

     3. Manage efficiency to improve sustainability

     4. Manage biodiversity and ecosystem

     5. Continuously improve

     6. Adhere to EU directives

The Chain of Custody (CoC) Standard concerns the supply of a product including all stages from the feedstock production up to consumption. It’s proof that you’re sourcing and trading responsibly. The Standard ensures monitoring of sustainable/ certified   volumes; enables traceable information to be transferred to the next supply chain step; and allows companies to make on-product   claims. The Chain of Custody Standard adheres to five fundamental principles to ensure high performance and consistency.

     1. Implement Mass Balance CoC

     2. Validate Bonsucro Data

     3. Reconcile Bonsucro Data

     4. Trace Bonsucro Data

     5. Identify Data to Clients

Source: Bonsucro. www.bonsucro.com

 

SQF Code – Safety Quality Food Program

The SQF Program is a leading food safety and quality certification system that is recognized by the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI). The program was designed to meet the needs of suppliers and buyers, to ensure their compliance with food safety regulations in both domestic and global markets at all stages of the supply chain. The SQF Program is a food safety and quality certification system including primary production, food processing and related industry, such as packaging and animal feed.

SQF Certification

There are three levels of certification. Each level is designed to indicate the stage of development of the producer’s food safety and quality management system. The design of the levels within the code, allows every supplier, from the smallest farmer to the largest manufacturer, to be eligible for SQF certification.

Level 1: Food safety fundamentals  SQF sugar image

Suppliers must establish pre-requisite programs incorporating fundamental food safety controls which are essential to providing a sound foundation for the production and manufacturing of safe food.  

Level 2: Certified HACCP based food safety plans  

In addition to Level 1 requirements, suppliers must complete and document a food safety risk assessment  of the product and process using the HACCP method, as well as an action plan to eliminate, prevent or reduce food safety hazards.  

Level 3: Comprehensive food safety and quality management system 

In additional to Level 1 and Level 2 requirements, suppliers must complete and document a food quality assessment of the product and its associated process, to identify the controls needed to ensure a   consistent level of quality. SQFI has combined the SQF 1000 Code, for primary producers, and the SQF  2000 Code, for manufacturers, distributors and brokers, to create one standard for food safety from farm   to fork. Additionally, by requiring both regulatory and customer compliance, the SQF Code is equipped for  an ever evolving market.

In addition to the SQF code, SQFI standards have expanded to include an ethical sourcing code and management system.

Source: Safe Quality Food Institute. www.sqfi.com

 

Kosher

Kashrut is a body of Jewish law that prescribes what foods can and cannot be eaten, and how they must be prepared and eaten. Kosher foods are those that meet the standards of Kashrut and hence are ‘fit’ or ‘proper’. Kashrut dietary laws are extensive and share a number of similarities with Halal.

Kosher imageFood certification organisation’s ensure that strict standards are met by producers or manufacturers before they are   entitled to label their food with the relevant certification trade mark. Non-religious examples of certification standards include those for organic food, free range eggs, and the Australian Made Certification. Producers and manufacturers    obtain certification to more effectively market their products to consumers. As with other food certification systems, to       be considered Kosher, food must meet the rules laid down by the organisation from which the food producer or manufacturer is seeking certification. Once the relevant standards are met, the food can then be packaged and marketed   as having been certified as Kosher by that organisation.

Kosher certification

Kosher food certification within Australia occurs through the three main bodies, the Kashrut Authority of Australia and New Zealand (based in NSW), Kosher Australia (based in Victoria) and Kashrut Authority of Western Australia. 

As with other certification processes, Kosher certification follows a series of steps;

  • The relevant food producer or manufacturer applies to the relevant certifying organisation (for example, Kosher Australia). This usually involves providing detailed information about the raw materials, ingredients and additives,  and the manufacturing process.
  • An inspection of the manufacturing site is then conducted by an appropriately qualified person on behalf of the certifying organisation to determine whether all the relevant requirements are consistently being met, and a report   is prepared. The applicant may be required to alter their manufacturing processes or ingredients, or to provide  further information about their supply chain.
  • A certification agreement is then concluded between the applicant and the certifying body, and Kosher accreditation or certification is awarded for a period of time.

Source: Parliament of Australia. http://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Parliamentary_Departments/Parliamentary_Library/pubs/rp/rp1617/Quick_Guides/KosherCertification

 

Halal

Halal is an Arabic word that means permitted or lawful in Islam.

All foods are Halal unless they are Haram (which means prohibited or unlawful). For example, all fruit and vegetables are Halal unless they are contaminated with Haram substances or the production plant contains Haram substances. Food products that are considered Haram include pork and its by-products, animals with fangs, Halal animals improperly slaughtered, lard, alcoholic drinks and foods contaminated with the aforementioned. More information about Halal and Haram foods can be found at:

Halal imageFood certification organisation’s ensure that strict standards are met by producers or manufacturers before they are entitled to label their food with the relevant certification trade mark. Non-religious examples of certification standards include those for organic food, free range eggs and the Australian Made and Produced certification. Producers and manufacturers obtain certification to more effectively market their products to consumers. As with other food certification systems, to be considered Halal food must meet the rules laid down by the organisation from which the food producer or manufacturer is seeking certification. Once the relevant standards are met, the food can then be packaged and marketed as having been certified as Halal by that organisation.

Halal certification

A number of Halal certification organisation’s operate within Australia, offering Halal certification services to Australian domestic food producers and manufacturers. As with other certification process, Halal certification follows a series of broad steps:

  • The relevant food producer or manufacturer applies to the relevant certifying organisation. This usually involves providing detailed information about the raw materials, ingredients and additives, and the manufacturing process.
  • An inspection of the manufacturing site is then conducted by an appropriately qualified person on behalf of the certifying organisation to determine whether all the relevant requirements are consistently being met, and a report prepared. The applicant may be required to alter their manufacturing processes or ingredients, or to provide further information about their supply chain.
  • A certification agreement is then concluded between the applicant and the certifying body, and Halal accreditation or certification is awarded for a period of time.

Source: Parliament of Australia. http://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Parliamentary_Departments/Parliamentary_Library/pubs/rp/rp1617/Quick_Guides/HalalCert

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